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Mercy Heart Center

TAVR and Recovery with Minimally Invasive Cardiovascular Surgery

More than 5 million Americans are diagnosed with heart valve disease each year, according to the American Heart Association. When one or more of your four heart valves fails to work properly, surgery is often required in order to replace the valve. Innovative procedures like a Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement – commonly known as TAVR – can provide beneficial treatment options and faster recovery for patients who may not be candidates for open heart surgery. As we continue this month’s focus on Heart Health Awareness, Dr. Sabe, Executive Director of Mercy Heart Center shares more.

Dr. Ahmed Sabe

Dr. Mark Tawil Explains the Latest Advances in Minimally Invasive Cardiovascular Surgery, Robotics , the Watchman Device and More!

Heart disease can happen at any age, and according to the Centers for Disease Control, younger adults are now being affected by the disease more often than in past years. High blood pressure, high cholesterol, smoking and obesity are just a few of the risk factors. Advances in cardiovascular medical treatment are making an impact on life expectancy, and since February is American Heart Health Awareness Month, today is the perfect opportunity to focus on heart health awareness and talk about the latest advances in minimally invasive heart surgery and robotic surgery with Mercy Cardiovascular Institute’s Dr. Mark Tawil.   

Dr. Mark Tawil, cardiovascular and thoracic surgeon from Mercy Cardiovascular Institute Explains the Latest Advances in Minimally Invasive Surgery on Health Matters .

Dr. Mark Tawil, cardiovascular and thoracic surgeon from Mercy Cardiovascular Institute Explains the Latest Advances in Minimally Invasive Surgery on Health Matters .

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Health Matters: Mercy Heart Center Registered Nurses Michelle Amos and Kim Swast Discuss Women's Heart Health

Health Matters: Mercy Heart Center Registered Nurses Michelle Amos and Kim Swast Discuss Women's Heart Health

February is American Heart Health Month, and this month we are focusing on heart health for both men and women.  Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. The good news? It is also one of the most preventable.  Making heart-healthy choices, knowing your family health history and the risk factors for heart disease, having regular check-ups and working with your physician to manage your health are all integral aspects of saving lives from this often, silent killer. Today we talk about women and heart disease, heart failure as well as the link between diabetes and heart disease with registered nurses Michelle Amos and Kim Swast from Mercy Heart Center.