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Health

Delay the Progression of Parkinson's Disease

People with Parkinson's Disease may notice changes or difficulty chewing, eating, speaking or swallowing at any time but tend to increase as the disease progresses. Just as Parkinson's Disease affects movement in other parts of the body, it also affects the muscles in the face, mouth and throat that are used in speaking and swallowing.  In this segment of Health Matters we talk about different types of therapy that help people adjust and maintain speaking abilities and understanding with therapists from Aultman Hospital. Also, if you're looking for general resources available in Northeast Ohio, check out the Ohio Parkinson's Foundation. 

 From left, Brad White and Paul White discuss Parkinson's Disease with Aultman Hospital's Michelle Sommers and Chad Gooding. 

From left, Brad White and Paul White discuss Parkinson's Disease with Aultman Hospital's Michelle Sommers and Chad Gooding. 

Robotic Surgery and Its Impact For the Future

Robotic surgery is a type of minimally invasive surgery, which means that instead of operating on patients through large incisions, mini-size surgical instruments that can fit through a series of quarter-inch incisions are used. Robotic surgery, or robot-assisted surgery, allows doctors to perform many types of complex procedures with more precision, flexibility and control than is possible with conventional techniques. Today we learn what this could mean for people who may have surgery in the future. Join us for a discussion with Dr. Steven Kelly, General Surgeon, Aultman Medical Group General Surgery.

 L-R: Health Matters hosts and pharmacists, Brad White and Paul White discuss robotic surgery with Dr. Steven Kelly, general surgeon, Aultman Medical Group General Surgery.

L-R: Health Matters hosts and pharmacists, Brad White and Paul White discuss robotic surgery with Dr. Steven Kelly, general surgeon, Aultman Medical Group General Surgery.

Health Matters: Mercy Heart Center Registered Nurses Michelle Amos and Kim Swast Discuss Women's Heart Health

Health Matters: Mercy Heart Center Registered Nurses Michelle Amos and Kim Swast Discuss Women's Heart Health

February is American Heart Health Month, and this month we are focusing on heart health for both men and women.  Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. The good news? It is also one of the most preventable.  Making heart-healthy choices, knowing your family health history and the risk factors for heart disease, having regular check-ups and working with your physician to manage your health are all integral aspects of saving lives from this often, silent killer. Today we talk about women and heart disease, heart failure as well as the link between diabetes and heart disease with registered nurses Michelle Amos and Kim Swast from Mercy Heart Center.

Health Matters: Children's Dyslexia Center of Canton with Vice Chairman Jim Fidler

Dyslexia is a language-based learning disability and refers to a group of symptoms, which results in difficulties with specific language skills, particularly reading as well as spelling, writing and pronouncing words. Dyslexia affects individuals throughout their lives; however, the impact can change throughout various stages in life. According to the International Dyslexia Association, it is considered a learning disability because dyslexia can make it very difficult for a student to succeed academically in the typical instructional environment. Also,  in its more severe forms, dyslexia can qualify a student for special education, special accommodations or extra support services. Today we talk with Jim Fidler of the Children's Dyslexia Center of Canton.

Health Matters: #CantonGoesRed for National Wear Red Day and American Heart Association's Go Red for Women Movement

As the number one killer of women, cardiovascular diseases, which include stroke, claim the life of a woman about every 80 seconds, according to the American Heart Association's Valerie Stutler. In fact, today heart disease claims more lives than all forms of cancer combined. This forces us to consider that a woman we know and love may be affected at any age.

 L-R: Health Matters hosts and pharmacists, Brad and Paul White with Valerie Stutler, social events coordinator for the Canton office of the American Heart Association.

L-R: Health Matters hosts and pharmacists, Brad and Paul White with Valerie Stutler, social events coordinator for the Canton office of the American Heart Association.

Health Matters: Dr. Simonette Jones, non-invasive cardiologist from Mercy Cardiovascular Institute

About 33% of Americans over age 20 have high blood pressure and over 5 million Americans have heart failure.  Of those diagnosed with heart failure, roughly 70%  also have high blood pressure.  These conditions increase a patient’s risk for heart attack, stroke and kidney disease.  Medication therapies continue to improve and manage the symptoms of these conditions – but there are many things we can do to control these diseases and improve our health.  This morning we will talk about risk factors, symptoms and treatment of these conditions – but also about the changes we can make in our lives to improve our health. Today, Dr. Simonette Jones, non-invasive cardiologist joins us from Mercy Cardiovascular Institute to talk about cardiovascular health issues. 

 (L-R) Brad White, R. Ph., Paul White, R. Ph. and Dr. Simonette Jones

(L-R) Brad White, R. Ph., Paul White, R. Ph. and Dr. Simonette Jones

Health Matters: Dr. Russell Ramey and Dr. Noman Rafique; October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month

October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women (after skin cancer). The American Cancer Society estimates this year about 252,710 new cases of invasive breast cancer will be diagnosed in women, and 40,610 will die from this disease. This morning we talk with Dr. Russell Ramey, general surgeon from Mercy Medical Center and Dr. Noman Rafique, oncologist and hematologist from Tri-County Hematology & Oncology about breast cancer screening options and breast cancer treatment.

 L-R: Health Matters Hosts Brad White, R. Ph, Paul White, R. Ph, Dr. Russell Ramey, general surgeon from Mercy Medical Center and Dr. Noman Rafique, oncologist and hematologist from Tri-County Hematology & Oncology prepare for the Health Matters program at WHBC-AM1480.

L-R: Health Matters Hosts Brad White, R. Ph, Paul White, R. Ph, Dr. Russell Ramey, general surgeon from Mercy Medical Center and Dr. Noman Rafique, oncologist and hematologist from Tri-County Hematology & Oncology prepare for the Health Matters program at WHBC-AM1480.

Health Matters: National Rehab Awareness Week

Health Matters: National Rehab Awareness Week

National Rehabilitation Awareness Week is held September 18-22, and during this time healthcare professionals focus on raising awareness of Rehab treatment, explaining what Rehab is, how it benefits patients and why it is vital in the recovery process of many patients. Dr. William Washington is part of NeuroCare Center, one of our program sponsors, and he is the Medical Director of Mercy’s Regional Rehabilitation Center. He brings 26 years of experience in his field and gives great insight into Rehab and the many forms it takes supporting patients.

Dr. William Washington.jpg

Health Matters: Jack Ford, senior vice president of Beaver Excavating and Dr. Brandon Smith, pediatric cardiologist at Akron Children's Hospital

When we think of heart disease and cardiovascular issues, we often think of adults later in age. However, approximately 40,000 children are born with a heart defect each year. And, at least eight of every 1,000 infants born each year have a heart defect. Thank goodness for organizations like the American Heart Association and volunteers across America who get involved not only to raise funds for research but also raise awareness of heart disease. Next month the Stark and Wayne County Healthy For Good Heart Walks will take place, with the Wayne County Walk, Saturday, September 16 at Secrest Arboretum in Wooster. The Stark County Walk will be held Saturday, September 30 at Kent State University-Stark. This walk is the Association’s premier event for raising funds to save lives from this country’s Number 1 and Number 5 killers – heart disease and stroke. 

Jack Ford, senior vice president of Beaver Excavating and chair of the American Heart Association’s Stark and Wayne County Healthy For Good Heart Walks and Dr. Brandon Smith, pediatric cardiologist at Akron Children’s Hospital Heart Center join us today.  

 Brad White, R. Ph. and Paul White, R. Ph. are joined by Jack Ford, senior vice president of Beaver Excavating and Brad's son Reagan in the WHBC studio.

Brad White, R. Ph. and Paul White, R. Ph. are joined by Jack Ford, senior vice president of Beaver Excavating and Brad's son Reagan in the WHBC studio.

Health Matters: Cardiovascular Health with Dr. Rizwan Sardar

Heart disease is the number one cause of death of both men and women in the United States. This includes heart disease, stroke and other cardiovascular diseases, according to the American Heart Association. Heart disease is often associated with men, but it is a major health risk for women as well. Statistics indicate every minute, approximately one woman dies from heart disease. Unfortunately, only one in five American women believes heart disease is her greatest health risk.  

It’s not all gloom and doom – there is some good news. Risk of cardiovascular disease can be reduced by diet and exercise, so it is important to know the risk factors. The statistics may be daunting, but cardiovascular disease can be treated. During today's program, Dr. Rizwan Sardar, cardiologist at Aultman Hospital joins Brad White, R Ph. and Paul White, R. Ph. to talk about treatment options for cardiovascular disease.

 

Dr. Rizwan Sardar with Paul White and Brad White

Health Matters: Dr. Brian Amison, Amison Dental Group, Discusses Dental Care for the Family

Health Matters: Dr. Brian Amison, Amison Dental Group, Discusses Dental Care for the Family

General dentists are the primary providers for dental care in patients of all ages. From children to seniors, dentists treat the entire family for overall health care which is crucial to mouth and general health. So, when it comes to baby teeth, sealants, root canals and beyond, regular dental care can not only treat problems but also prevent many issues – from cavities to gum disease.

Dr. Brian Amison from the Amison Dental Group joins us to talk about all things dental including root canals, oral cancer, preventive visits and his upcoming event Dentistry From the Heart.

Health Matters: CommQuest Guests Discuss Opiate and Heroin Addiction and August 2 Symposium

In August of 2015 Community Services of Stark County merged with Quest Recovery Services to create CommQuest.  Together they provide a broad range of services to the residents of Stark County to provide a continuum of care for behavioral health issues in our county.  This includes addiction and recovery services. Ohio’s opiate epidemic is a crisis of unparalleled proportions with devastating, often deadly, consequences. Opiates include both heroin and prescription pain reliever medications. Today our guests discuss the epidemic and the CommQuest Addiction and Recovery Symposium on Wednesday, August 2, 2017 in downtown Canton. 

 CommQuest's President and CEO Keith Rochadel and Fund & Business Development Coordinator Sara Stone discuss the opiate and heroin epidemic 

CommQuest's President and CEO Keith Rochadel and Fund & Business Development Coordinator Sara Stone discuss the opiate and heroin epidemic 

Health Matters: Heat-related Illness

Heat-related disease and illness affects people of all ages. From toddlers to teens and seniors, summer temperatures are a major factor in health issues. This week Mark Adams, environmental health director for the City of Canton, is our guest on the Health Matters program. Mark discusses the importance of hydration in people with chronic illnesses as well as mosquito-born diseases and how to safely remove ticks. The Medicine Center Pharmacy focuses on patient health, and whether you’re spending the weekend camping, swimming, fishing or gardening, we want our listeners to stay healthy this summer.